Devlin family tree

Origen del apellido | I Generación | II Generación | III Generación | IV Generación | V Generación | VI Generación
subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link | subglobal3 link
subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link | subglobal4 link
subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link | subglobal5 link
subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link
subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link
subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link

Galería de Imágenes

Utilice el menú de la izquierda para acceder a las distintas imágenes.
Cruces Celtas

The Ardboe Cross.

Located 7 km east of Coagh, Co. Tyrone, on the shore of Lough Neagh stands Northern Ireland's best example of a 10th century sculptured cross.

The cross is 5.6m tall and the arms span over 1m.

The cross is represented on the Devlin coat of arms.

The area around Ardboe, also known as Muintirevlin, is derived from the Irish Muintir Doibhlin meaning "the people of Devlin", or the land where the O'Devlin lived.

It seems fairly certain that at some time in the middle of the 11th century, the ancestors of the Devlins first occupied the territory later known as Muinterevlin.

The ancestors of the O Devlins in earlier times occupied Drumleene, which is just north of Lifford.

 

ver más información en / more information at:
The Devlin Family of Clonmany, Co. Donegal, Ireland - Daniel J. Devlin

 

© Copyright HENRY CLARK and licensed for reuse
under this Creative Commons Licence

The high cross of Ardboe stands on the western shore of Lough Neagh, approximately 1.6km south of Newport Trench.

In the eighteenth century, pilgrimages were made to the cross and the devout moved round it on their knees while praying. The water of the lough itself was believed to possess healing powers.

The top stone of the cross became dislodged around 1817 and the upper portion, including the arms, fell in 1846. Colonel Stewart of Killymoon then carefully carried out its re-erection and restoration.



One of the finest examples of an
ancient high cross in Ireland

The cross probably dates from the tenth or eleventh century.
It stands approximately 5.6m high, and the arms are 1m wide. The shaft is 58 cm wide and 35cm deep.

The northern upper portion of the ring is missing.

The religious motifs sculptured into the stone cross are very weatherworn, and while some of the designs are quite clear, others are not so obvious and are open to more than one interpretation.

The east (Old Testament) side depicts Adam and Eve; the sacrifices of Isaac; Daniel and the lions; the children of the fiery furnace; a figure with bell and crozier surrounded by people; and Christ in glory with scales and flames beneath.

On the west (New Testament) side are: the visit of the Magi; the miracle of Cana; the multiplication of loaves and fishes; the entry to Jerusalem; and the arrest and crucifixion.

On the south side are: Cain and Abel; David struggling with the lion; David killing Goliath; and the raven feeding Paul and Anthony in the Egyptian desert.

The scenes on the north side are less easy to interpret, but the baptism and anointing of David, the judgement of Solomon, and the slaughter of the innocents have all been suggested.

Culture Northen Ireland. org

 

| Contact Us | ©1998 - 2012 TJDevlin